USB Video Class Compliant Webcam Makers

Who Are The Major Manufacturers Of Mac Friendly Web Cameras?


With the technology industry's wide adoption of the USB Video Class computer hardware specification, more web cameras than ever are Macintosh compatible right out of the box. No additional software is required for BASIC operation, though cameras from manufacturers in the top-tier tend to provide a superior, sharp image with good light response. Cheaper and lesser cameras from cheap overseas suppliers are more likely to need additional, 3rd party Mac webcam utilities to adjust, control and improve the camera's image.


Top-Tier Mac Compatible Webcam Brands


Logitech - Belated but increasingly broad support for their cameras on OSX
Creative Labs - Long-standing support for driverless UVC cameras on the Mac
IPevo - Specialists in close-range, document cameras for education and business
Microsoft - Widespread adoption of UVC webcam standard in recent HD models
HP - Declining in consumer peripheral market, focusing on Printing and Enterprise

Second-Tier Mac Compatible Webcam Makers


FreeTalk - Partnered with Skype Store for PC/Mac cameras and headsets
RocketFish - Widely available as a BestBuy ‘House’ brand peripheral line
GearHead - Longtime player in the cheap Mac compatible webcam market
Hercules - European graphics and computer accessory manufacturer
Genius/Kye - Chinese manufacturer with UVC camera support in many models
MacAlly - Long supporter of Mac platform but their two camera models both suck

All-The-Rest : Cheap Import Webcams


There’s a massive market of cheap, generic, and frankly, junk web cameras from no-name China importers often selling for $10-$15. Many are look-alike knockoffs that have designs that resemble popular, quality webcam brand models. Many of these cheapo cams do support the UVC - USB Video Class standard and may actually deliver a reasonably decent image. That said, a lot of them don’t. Nearly all the cheap webcams we’ve tested have second-rate, poor-sounding integrated microphone elements, inferior build-quality, mediocre optics or exceptionally high failure rates right out of the box or shortly after purchase. If you only spend around ten bucks on a camera, you’re going to get what you paid for...